Investigation and chemical composition of plants used as anti-termite infestation and repellant in eastern Tigray, Ethiopia

  • Shilashi Badasa College of Natural and Computational Science, Ambo University, P.O. Box:19, Ambo, Ethiopia.
  • Teklay Mezgebe College of Natural and Computational Science, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia
  • Yemane Tilahun College of Natural and Computational Science, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia.
Keywords: Ethno-botanical, Termites, Mortality, Repellency

Abstract

Development of insect resistance to synthetic chemical, the high operational cost, environmental pollution, toxicity to humans and harmful effect on non-target organisms have created the need for developing alternative approaches to control insect pest. Botanical survey and extraction of top three plants was conducted to identify the plants used against termites’ infestation and to screen chemical composition. The present research reports a total 15 plants used to control termites’ infestation as the information collected and recorded from the study area (table-2). Phytochemical analysis was conducted for top three plants depends on informants’ ideas and extracted by Maceration with acetone (Nicotiana glauca Graham, Euphorbia cactus Boiss and Aloe vera L) showed that presence of various active ingredients (table-5). The highest repellency was induced by positive control called diazinon (98.33%). Acetone extract of Nicotiana glauca Graham was found to be more repellency at 1.00gm/mL (90.48%) at all concentrations than Euphorbia cactus followed by Aloevera L however, no repellence was observed for negative untreated control. Acetone extract of Nicotiana glauca Graham test has shown best level of mortality than Euphorbia cactus Boiss and Aloe vera L extracts.

Published
2018-07-05
How to Cite
BadasaS., MezgebeT., & TilahunY. (2018). Investigation and chemical composition of plants used as anti-termite infestation and repellant in eastern Tigray, Ethiopia. Journal of Science and Sustainable Development, 6(2), 51-61. https://doi.org/10.20372/au.jssd.6.2.2018.089
Section
Full Orginal Article